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Colloidal Silver Facts

Q: Does silver have a historical use other than as a medium of monetary exchange?
Q: How is silver able to kill one-celled micro-organisms?
Q: Are colloidal silver and colloidal gold safe?
Q: Does the common generic term “colloidal silver” have more than one definition?
Q: What is the USFDA’s definition of “colloidal silver” and why are they concerned about it’s usage?
Q: Can colloidal silver and colloidal gold be considered drugs or do they interact with drugs?
Q: Can colloidal silver or colloidal gold cause an allergic reaction?
Q: Can colloidal silver cause Argyria?
Q: Can colloidal silver cause flu like symptoms or diarrhea?
Q: Which colloidal silver is most effective, ionic or non-ionic?
Q: How important is silver particle size and is a high ppm colloidal product required for effectiveness?
Q: Does colloidal silver kill only “bad” bacteria, leaving “good” flora unaffected?
Q: Are colloidal silver products containing gelatins/proteins, salts, or nitrates effective?
Q: Why is there an EPA Reference Dose, (RfD) for silver if it has no associated adverse effects ?

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Conjunctivitis/Eye Infection

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Pinkeye (also called conjunctivitis) is redness and swelling of the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane that lines the eyelid and eye surface. The lining of the eye is usually clear. If irritation or infection occurs, the lining becomes red and swollen. See illustrations of a normal eye and one with conjunctivitis.

Lacrimal/Tear Gland

Lacrimal/Tear Gland

1. Tear Gland (Lacrimal Gland)
2. Cornea
3. Eyeball
4. Optic Nerve

Pinkeye is very common. It usually is not serious and goes away in 7 to 10 days without medical treatment.

Common symptoms of pinkeye are:

  • Eye redness (hyperemia).
  • Swollen, red eyelids.
  • More tearing than usual.
  • Feeling as if something is in the eye (foreign-body sensation or keratoconjunctivitis).
  • An itching or burning feeling.
  • Mild sensitivity to light (photophobia).
  • Drainage from the eye.

Most cases of pinkeye are caused by:

  • Infections caused by viruses or bacteria.
  • Dry eyes from lack of tears or exposure to wind and sun.
  • Chemicals, fumes, or smoke (chemical conjunctivitis).
  • Allergies.
  • Foreign bodies, such as dirt or bugs.

Viral and bacterial pinkeye are contagious and spread very easily. Since most pinkeye is caused by viruses for which there is usually no medical treatment, preventing its spread is important. Poor hand-washing is the main cause of the spread of pinkeye. Sharing an object, such as a washcloth or towel, with a person who has pinkeye can spread the infection. For tips on how to prevent the spread of pinkeye, see the Prevention section of this topic.

People with infectious pinkeye should not attend school or go to work until symptoms improve.

  • If the pinkeye is caused by a virus, the person can usually return to day care, school, or work when symptoms begin to improve, typically in 3 to 5 days. Medications are not usually used to treat viral pinkeye, so it is important to prevent the spread of the infection. Pinkeye caused by a herpes virus, which is rare, can be treated with an antiviral medication. Home treatment of viral pinkeye symptoms can help you feel more comfortable while the infection goes away.
  • If the pinkeye is caused by bacteria, the person can usually return to day care, school, or work 24 hours after an antibiotic has been started if symptoms have improved. Prescription antibiotic treatment usually kills the bacteria that cause pinkeye.

Pinkeye may be more serious if you:

  • Have a condition that decreases your body's ability to fight infection (impaired immune system).
  • Have vision in only one eye.
  • Wear contact lenses.

Red eye

Red eye is a more general term that includes not only pinkeye but also many other problems that cause redness on or around the eye, not just the lining. Pinkeye is the main cause of red eye. Red eye has other causes, including:

  • Foreign bodies, scrapes, and sores on the cornea. For more information, go to the topic Eye Injuries.
  • Glaucoma. For more information, go to the topic Eye Problems, Noninjury, or Glaucoma.
  • Infection of the eye socket and areas around the eye. For more information, go to the topic Eye Problems, Noninjury.
  • Injury to or infection of deeper parts of the eye (for example, uveitis, iritis, or keratitis). For more information, go to the topic Eye Injuries.

Swollen, red eyelids may also be caused by styes, a lump called a chalazion, inflammation of the eyelid (blepharitis), or tear deficiency (dry eyes). For more information, go to the topics Styes and Chalazia or Eyelid Problems (Blepharitis).

Home Treatment

Home treatment for pinkeye will help reduce your pain and keep your eye free of drainage. If you wear contacts, remove them and wear glasses until your symptoms have gone away completely. Thoroughly clean your contacts and storage case.

Cold compresses or warm compresses (whichever feels best) can be used. If an allergy is the problem, a cool compress may feel better. If the pinkeye is from an infection, a warm, moist compress may soothe the eye and help reduce its redness and swelling. Warm, moist compresses can spread infection from one eye to the other. Use a different compress for each eye, and use a clean compress for each application.

When cleaning the eye, wipe from the inside (next to the nose) toward the outside. Use a clean surface for each wipe so that drainage being cleaned away is not rubbed back across the eye. If tissues or wipes are used, make sure they are put in the trash and not allowed to sit around. If washcloths are used to clean the eye, put them in the laundry right away so that no one else picks them up or uses them. After wiping your eye, wash your hands to prevent the pinkeye from spreading.

After pinkeye has been diagnosed, the person should:

  • Prevent the spread of pinkeye by following the instructions in the Prevention section of this topic.
  • Not attend day care or school or go to work until pinkeye has improved.
    • If the pinkeye is caused by a virus, the person can usually return to day care, school, or work when symptoms begin to improve, typically in 3 to 5 days. Medications are not usually used to treat viral pinkeye, so preventing its spread is important. Home treatment of the symptoms will help you feel more comfortable while the infection goes away.
    • If the pinkeye is caused by bacteria, the person can usually return to day care, school, or work after the infection has been treated for 24 hours with an antibiotic and symptoms are improving. Prescription antibiotic treatment usually kills the bacteria that cause pinkeye.
  • Use medication as directed. Medication may include:
    • Eyedrops. See an illustration of inserting eyedrops.
    • Eye ointment.

Check Your Symptoms

If you have any of the following symptoms, evaluate those symptoms first.

  • Blurred vision, loss of vision, blood in the eye, or a red eye: Go to the topic Eye Problems, Noninjury.
  • An eye injury: Go to the topic Eye Injuries.
  • An object in your eye: Go to the topic Objects in the Eye.
  • A liquid or solid chemical in your eye: Go to the topic Burns to the Eye.

Symptoms to Watch For

Use the Check Your Symptoms section to evaluate your symptoms if any of the following occur during home treatment.

  • Decreased, double, or blurred vision that doesn't clear with blinking develops.
  • Eye pain is present for more than 24 hours or eye pain increases.
  • Sensitivity to light (photophobia) develops.
  • Signs of an infection develop.
  • Symptoms become more severe or frequent.

Prevention

Pinkeye is spread through contact with the eye drainage, which contains the virus or bacteria that caused the pinkeye. Touching an infected eye leaves drainage on your hand. If you touch your other eye or an object when you have drainage on your hand, the virus or bacteria can be spread.

The following tips help prevent the spread of pinkeye.

  • Wash your hands before and after:
    • Touching the eyes or face.
    • Using medicine in the eyes.
  • Do not share eye makeup.
  • Do not use eye makeup until the infection is fully cured, because you could reinfect yourself with the eye makeup products. If your eye infection was caused by bacteria or a virus, throw away your old makeup and buy new products.
  • Do not share contact lens equipment, containers, or solutions.
  • Do not wear contact lenses until the infection is cured. Thoroughly clean your contacts before wearing them again.
  • Do not share eye medication.
  • Do not share towels, linens, pillows, or handkerchiefs. Use clean linens, towels, and washcloths daily.
  • Wear gloves if you are looking into someone else's eye for a foreign object.
  • Wear eye protection when in the wind, heat, or cold to prevent eye irritation.
  • Wear safety glasses when working with chemicals.

Blocked Tear Ducts

Tears normally drain from the eye through small tubes called tear ducts that stretch from the eye into the nose. A blocked tear duct occurs when the opening of the duct that normally allows tears to drain from the eyes is obstructed or fails to open properly. If a tear duct remains blocked, the tear duct sac fills with fluid and may become swollen and inflamed, and sometimes infected.

 

Eye

 

1. Eye
2. Blocked Tear Duct
3. Nasolacrimal Duct

Tear Duct Blockage

Blocked tear ducts are thought to occur in about 30% of newborns. However, noticeable symptoms are present in only 2% to 4% of newborns. A blocked tear duct that is present at birth (congenital) is sometimes called nasolacrimal duct obstruction or dacryostenosis.

Blocked tear ducts are uncommon in adulthood. They mostly occur in older adults and are usually the result of an injury or related to another disorder.

What causes a blocked tear duct?

In babies, the most common cause of a blocked tear duct is the failure of the thin tissue at the end of the tear duct to open normally at or near birth.

Other less common causes of blocked tear ducts in children include:

  • Infections.
  • Abnormal growth of the nasal bone that puts pressure on a tear duct and closes it off.
  • Undeveloped or closed openings in the corners of the eyes (puncta) where tears drain into the tear ducts.

In adults, tear ducts may become blocked as a result of a thickening of the tear duct lining, nasal or sinus problems, injuries to the bone and tissues around the eyes (such as the cheekbones), infections, or abnormal growths such as tumors.

What are the symptoms?

Usually, the first symptom of a blocked tear duct is excessive tearing, ranging from a wet appearance of the eye to tears running down the cheek. Babies who have blocked tear ducts usually have symptoms within the first few days to the first few weeks after birth. If infection develops in the eye's drainage system for tears, inflammation that includes redness and swelling may develop around the eye or nose. Also, yellow mucus can build up in the corner of the eye, and the eyelids may stick together. In severe cases, infection can spread to the eyelids and the area around the eye.

The symptoms of a blocked tear duct may get worse after an upper respiratory infection, such as a cold or sinus infection. Also, symptoms may be more noticeable after exposure to wind and cold.

How is a blocked tear duct diagnosed?

A blocked tear duct is diagnosed based on a medical history and a physical examination. Additional tests may be used to measure tear production, to see whether tears are draining normally from the eyes into the nose to determine where a blockage is located, or to help determine the cause of the blockage.

Cause Tear Duct Blockage

The most common cause of a blocked tear duct is the failure of the thin tissue, or membrane, that covers the tear duct (lacrimal duct) to open normally into the nasal passage shortly after birth. This disrupts the usual drainage system for tears.

Symptoms usually are not noticed if the blockage resolves on its own before a baby starts producing tears. Normally, tears start forming within the first few days to weeks following birth.

Less common causes of blocked tear ducts in babies can include:

  • Infection in the tubes that drain tears from the eyes to the nose (dacryocystitis).
  • Blockage of the tear duct at both ends (dacryocystocele).
  • Abnormal growth of the nasal bone that puts pressure on a tear duct, closing it off.
  • Undeveloped or closed openings in the corners of the eyes (puncta) where tears normally drain into the tear ducts.

The cause of blocked tear ducts in adults is usually related to another disorder or an injury. For example, a blocked tear duct may result from a thickening of the tear duct lining, abnormal tissue or structures in the nose, or complications of surgery on or around the nose. These types of problems are more likely to occur after age 60 than in earlier adulthood.

Tear Duct Blockage Treatment

Babies born with blocked tear ducts usually do not need treatment. More than 90% of blocked ducts clear up on their own by

  1. 1 year of age.
  2. However home treatment measures to keep the eye clean and to help drain the duct can help prevent infection. Antibiotics usually are needed if signs of infection develop, such as redness, swelling, or yellowish discharge.

If the duct remains blocked after the baby is 6 months to about 1 year old, a simple probing procedure may be done. Probing successfully opens the duct in more than 90% of babies. 2Probing is not usually done in adults because it is rarely effective.

Symptoms of Tear Duct Blockage

Babies with blocked tear ducts usually develop symptoms once they start producing tears, which can be any time from the first few days to the first few weeks after birth. Symptoms often affect only one eye and usually include:

  • Excessive tearing. The eye may appear moist or wet with or without drops flowing down the face (epiphora). Very few babies produce a frequent heavy stream of tears.
  • Buildup of a yellowish white substance at the inner corner of the eye. It may also collect on the eyelashes and the lining of the eyelids (conjunctiva). The eyelids may stick together, especially after sleeping.
  • Swelling and redness of the eyelids and irritation of the surrounding skin. If a tear duct (lacrimal duct) remains partially or completely blocked, the tear duct sac fills with fluid, and an infection can develop in the drainage system. The infection may cause inflammation (redness and swelling) and tenderness alongside the nose, fever, and mucus or pus in the eye.

The symptoms of a blocked tear duct may get worse after an upper respiratory infection, such as a cold or sinus infection. Also, symptoms may be more noticeable after exposure to wind and cold.

What Happens When Tear Ducts are Blocked

Tear ducts can be fully or partially blocked. The blockage causes tears to back up within the tear duct system and may cause them to overflow onto the face (epiphora). The blockage may also allow infection to develop in the tear ducts as bacteria and other substances collect in the eye. If the tear duct opens by itself, the infection may clear up without treatment.

Most blocked tear ducts are present at birth (congenital) and resolve on their own or open with simple treatment (probing) during the first year of life. More than 90% of all blocked ducts open on their own by the time a baby is 12 months old. 2If probing is done within the first 13 months of life, it is about 97% effective in opening the duct. 3

A blocked tear duct by itself does not usually permanently affect a baby's vision or increase the likelihood of having additional eye problems.

Infections may develop many times in the affected eye. Rarely, infection may spread to the eyelids and skin around the eye (periorbital cellulitis). Sometimes a pus-filled sac (dacryocystitis) also forms.

In adults, most blocked tear ducts are caused by infection, structural problems related to injury or surgery, or abnormal growths within the drainage system. Treatment for a blocked tear duct depends on the exact cause.

  • Infections usually clear up with antibiotic treatment. Left untreated, the infection may resolve on its own. However, the area may stay swollen (but not tender), and the tear duct can easily become infected again later. If the infection does not clear up on its own and is left untreated, the area around the tear duct can become swollen and tender. The affected eye may become crusty from mucous drainage.
  • If structural changes or abnormal growths are causing the tear duct blockage, surgery may be needed to correct the problem.

Home Treatment

Blocked tear ducts most often occur in babies. If your baby is born with a blocked tear duct, it will usually clear up on its own by 1 year of age.

You can help prevent infection in your or your baby's blocked tear duct by keeping the eye clean and using gentle massage techniques. Wash your hands before and after touching the eye area.

To keep the eye clean:

  • Wipe away any drainage around the eye. Moisten a clean cotton ball or washcloth with warm (not hot) water, and gently wipe from the inner (near the nose) to the outer part of the eye. With each wipe, use a new or clean part of the cotton ball or washcloth. Keep a supply of clean cotton balls moistened with water in a sealed plastic bag for use when you are away from home.
  • If eyelashes become crusted with drainage, clean them with a moist cotton ball using a gentle, downward motion. If the eyelids become stuck together, place a clean, warm, wet cotton ball over that eye for a few minutes to help loosen the crust.

Massage should only be used under the advice and direction of a doctor. Usually, it is done 2 to 3 times a day for several months.

Prevention of Tear Duct Blockage

Most blocked tear ducts cannot be prevented. The majority of blocked tear ducts are present at birth (congenital) when the thin tissue covering the tear duct does not open normally.

However, you can help prevent some conditions that can cause blocked tear ducts, such as:

  • Sinus or eye infections. If you develop symptoms of these types of infections, see your doctor right away for treatment. For more information, see the topic Sinusitis or Pinkeye.
  • Facial injuries. Wear a helmet when playing contact sports, such as football.

 

Advanced Colloidal Silver and the other supplements we sell are not drugs and the information and opinions we offer are based upon use of these products as Dietary Supplements only. We have no doctors on staff and do not offer medical advice concerning colloidal silver, colloidal gold or any other dietary supplements. Although you may choose to supplement with colloidal silver, colloidal gold, and other mineral and vitamin supplements, we suggest that you consult a licensed physician if you believe you have a life threatening health issue. We also recommend that you do comprehensive research about colloidal silver, colloidal gold and all dietary supplements in general before accepting our opinions or the opinions of anyone else about how to care for your health.

The USFDA has not evaluated, nor rendered approval for any statements or research cited herein, nor have they approved any representations or opinions concerning colloidal silver, colloidal gold or any other dietary supplement products on this website. These products are dietary supplements and are not intended to diagnose, cure, prevent or treat any disease.

Utopia Silver Supplements does not assume the role of representative, fiduciary or surety on behalf of any person(s) or individual(s) unless expressly agreed in writing. Anyone purchasing our supplements are believed by us to be responsible adults who have exercised their right to do research and are making an informed decision. All rights are reserved, without prejudice.

 

 

 
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